To subitize or not to subitize: When people know how wrong they are counting blips

In some parts of New York state, it recently snowed 18 inches (~45 centimeters) following a major winter storm. With every hour, the snow piled higher and higher – but some of the increments in accumulation, especially toward the beginning, felt bigger, while others took longer to notice. You might even have the feeling that […]

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From Valerian to Mymou: Gee Whiz cognitive training of primates

Ready Player One. Valerian. Worlds in chaos that need human video gamers to save their worlds via virtual reality. Similarly, high-tech gadgets utilizing facial recognition or voice activation tools to access superpower suits or weapons are the secret to saving the world in Iron Man or The Incredibles. Even our smart phones today utilize various […]

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The early shining bird flies longer: Career development determines NBA players’ performance decline

Even beautiful minds take time to develop and mature. There is evidence that even an alleged child prodigy such as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who started composing at age 5, required 10 years of practice to produce an outstanding piece of creativity. Alas, even beautiful minds will eventually turn from productivity to retirement, and no matter […]

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#PSprereg: A permanent home and homage to the Twitterati

The digital event dedicated to preregistration drew to a close last week, after a series of 8 posts. #PSprereg has now been given a permanent home, at this landing page. Feel free to bookmark the page or circulate the link to interested parties for easy (and permanent) access to the collection of 8 posts. As […]

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Avoiding Nimitz Hill with more than a Little Red Book: Summing up #PSprereg

At 1 am on 6 August 1997 Korean Air Flight 801, on approach to Guam, flew into Nimitz Hill, 6 km short of the runway, killing 228 of the 254 people on board. The approach occurred in limited visibility and while the instrument landing system was out of service. The crash was a classic example […]

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Psychological science needs theory development before preregistration

“(…) a substantial proportion of research effort in experimental psychology isn’t expended directly in the explanation business; it is expended in the business of discovering and confirming effects” —Cummins (2000). I am contributing to this digital event from a theoretician’s perspective. I thought I’d be upfront about this to set the right expectations. Theoretical perspectives […]

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You must tug that thread: why treating preregistration as a gold standard might incentivize poor behavior

It is too early to know whether the recent period of methodological introspection in psychological science, and the sciences in general, will lead to positive changes in practices. As with any revolution, there is the potential of moving backward. One problem that has been consistently acknowledged is the problem of incentives: what gets one attention […]

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