From Playfair to MATLAB: Not all graphs are made equal

Statistical graphs are so ubiquitous and part of our daily work that we may forget how powerful they are. Since their invention by William Playfair a little over 200 years ago, graphs have become indispensable tools not just in science and business, but also in politics. Indeed, one of Playfair’s contributions was to draw attention […]

Continue Reading

Direct current against implicit associations: Transcranial stimulation can reduce bias in information processing

Cogito ergo sum. This famous utterance by René Descartes translates into “I think, therefore I am.” Thinking is what ostensibly makes us human—quite literally so because homo sapiens means “wise man”. But do we really think (much)? If we are so wise, how come fake election news stories outperformed real news on Facebook during the U.S. presidential […]

Continue Reading

The revolution will not be alphabetized: Alphabetizing in-text citations biases citation rates

Imagine a world in which Einstein crafted his general theory of relativity – discovering and codifying the laws that govern light, space, and time – then went about his life, never publishing, and never telling another person. It may seem obvious, but scientific knowledge, in order to influence the generation of future scientific knowledge or […]

Continue Reading

Transferring Lemons to Lemonade: Using the Stroop Effect to Transfer Attentional States

There are some tasks that require cognitive processes that are habitual, automatic, and to some degree effortless, such as seeing a word and automatically reading it or seeing two numbers and automatically processing their magnitudes (e.g., seeing 5 and 3 and perceiving 5 to be greater). There are other tasks that require cognitive processes that […]

Continue Reading

Weighting or besting? Speeded multi-attribute choice

The last few weeks, I’ve been very busy with the logistics of organizing a mid-size conference that will be held this summer.  Some of the decisions, like the city and the approximate timing, have been made for me, but I’ve had to choose between competing hotels, make a schedule with talks, workshops, symposia, keynotes, breaks, […]

Continue Reading

To subitize or not to subitize: When people know how wrong they are counting blips

In some parts of New York state, it recently snowed 18 inches (~45 centimeters) following a major winter storm. With every hour, the snow piled higher and higher – but some of the increments in accumulation, especially toward the beginning, felt bigger, while others took longer to notice. You might even have the feeling that […]

Continue Reading
1 2 3 44