The uncompromising red of a Ferrari: Feature inferences in probabilistic categorization

The world around us is structured. Certain features of objects just go together. Imagine a muscular sports car in a 1950s black-and-white photograph, like this classic Ferrari 340: What do you think its color was? And what color was this 1950’s VW beetle? Chances are you did not think that the Ferrari was some mushy […]

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From Replication to Reproducible knowledge: A hybrid method to combine evidence across studies

Reproducibility is the hallmark of science. It has been argued that a finding needs to be repeatable to count as a scientific discovery and that replicability is a line of demarcation that separates science from pseudoscience. The fact that a recent large replication effort of 100 studies found that fewer than half of cognitive and social psychology […]

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When holistic isn’t a whole lot better: Eye-movements during face recognition reveal cognitive decline

There are certain truths in life that we may find difficult to accept. Some of these truths include admitting when we’re wrong, admitting when we’ve been beaten, and if you’re anything like me, admitting when you’ve gained a couple of pounds around the midsection (you know the ones that have inspired our New Year’s resolution […]

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Overcoming babble with a bubble: “Seeing” speech can make language faster to process

Do you like talking on the phone to strangers? No? Well, neither do I. And for good reason – talking to someone you do not know over noisy speakers that lose part of the sound spectrum can be challenging, especially if you struggle with hearing loss or are a non-native speaker of the language, who […]

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From Featured Content to featured teaching: The sequel

How can the Psychonomic Society’s publications and digital content help with teaching cognitive psychology?  With the “learning groups” feature! In Spring 2018 I used the featured content blog posts to make an assignment for my undergraduate cognitive psychology class at Fontbonne University, and it worked really well.  This post expands on an earlier one I […]

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Wrestling with the “irresistible forces”: Behavioral and neurocognitive markers of emotion regulation

We experience potentially emotive stimuli all the time. Some of us suffer intense outrage when we mistakenly tune into Fox News. Others have the same experience when they stumble upon CNN. We all have developed strategies to cope with those events, a skill known as emotion regulation. Although emotions are often portrayed as “irresistible forces”—there […]

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The good, the bad, and the media multi-tasking: It’s all the internet’s fault. Or is it?

Apparently the internet, video games, and social media are damaging our children’s development, and are responsible for the increase in autism over the last few decades—or so it has been claimed, although that claim hasn’t withstood scrutiny. Similarly, Wikipedia has an entry for something known as Internet addiction disorder, which apparently occurs when internet use […]

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