Lasting Learning in Pasteur’s Quadrant

“You guys know an awful lot that could really benefit the public”—this is the motto of Lasting Learning (http://www.lastinglearning.com/), a start-up company run by Cameron Broumand, a former real estate man whom I interviewed recently about his vision for how Psychonomic knowledge can feature in a commercial enterprise. Cameron’s story starts with his experience as a […]

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Corralling the Texas Sharp Shooter: $1,000,000 Reward

Legend has it that in Texas, and perhaps other jurisdictions where the value of pi is determined by political vote, sharpshooters market their skills by first firing a shotgun at a barn door and then painting a bull’s eye around their preferred hole. There has been much concern recently that parts of science are not immune […]

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When the tiger pounces into your head before it is near you: the looming bias and your survival

You are deep in the Amazonian rain forest and there is a rustle behind you that’s coming closer. Guess what your brain is doing at that moment? It’s planning your escape. We plan our escape the moment we hear an approaching sound but we ignore a crisis that has been looming for decades until it […]

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Cruel to be kind but not cruel for cash: Resolving moral dilemmas in the dictator game

Living in a world suffused with news about violent conflict around the world, it is easy to lose sight of the fact that humans are, by and large, averse to harming others. Even in war, the reluctance of soldiers to fire at their opponents is legendary, and overcoming this reluctance is a cornerstone of military training. […]

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From Bach to Bayes and Wales: the Richard Morey challenge

Towards the end of last year, submissions from Psychonomics authors who expressed an interest in a post on their article began to outpace the ability of our team—that is me, Anna, Cassie, Gary, Melissa, and Steve—to keep up with reporting all of this interesting science to a broader audience. To deal with the growing backlog, the Psychonomic Society thankfully approved […]

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Size matters—and not just in the movies

We are born with the neural circuitry required to detect the emotion in facial expressions. By the age of 7 months, human infants clearly distinguish between faces that are angry and others that are happy or neutral. At the same age, effects of parenting are also beginning to emerge, with infants of parents who are particularly sensitive […]

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Cognitive continental drift: the American vs. European schools of thought about thought

A different sort of American Revolution took place in the ‘60s and ‘70s. The rift was again between the US and Britain, with those American upstarts once more insisting on going their own way. But this was a quiet revolution, so quiet that few people even noticed it. It was a revolution in how we […]

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